Run a campaign to close doors and windows when the heating is on

Trinity C of E First School, Friday, 01 March 2019
30 Taking action around the school KS1, KS2, KS3, KS4, KS5

What you did

This week Energy Sparks discussed the importance of keeping the doors and windows closed when the heating is on at school. The children decided that if the classrooms are too hot we should turn the heating down instead of opening windows.  The children made posters in pairs which they will share with their classes. On the poster they included symbols and pictures to remind people to close doors and windows. They also included the temperature guide: 
  • Normal classrooms: 18°C
  • Corridors: 15°C
  • Areas with high levels of activity (e.g. sports halls): 15°C
  • Areas with low levels of activity: 21°C
  • Special needs schools or areas with very young children: 21°Normal classrooms: 18°C
  • Corridors: 15°C
  • Areas with high levels of activity (e.g. sports halls): 15°C
  • Areas with low levels of activity: 21°C
  • Special needs schools or areas with very young children: 21°C

Energy Sparks will present these posters in their classes next week to ensure that the message is spread around the school. 

 

Activity description

It is very common for classrooms to have the heating on and windows and doors open for fresh air or cooling. This is a big waste of energy!  Turning off radiators first before you open windows and doors is really important. 
Can you run a campaign to get everyone in the school to remember to always keep windows and doors closed when the heating is on? Remember you can reduce classroom temperatures using heating thermostats  and boiler controls rather than opening doors and windows. 

Things to consider when planning your campaign:
  1. Who will have responsibility for closing doors and windows? Can both pupils and staff do this?
  2. How will you promote your campaign? How will you let other classes know what they are supposed to be doing and why?
  3. Who will monitor whether doors and windows are closed? Will you have class energy monitors or will your Energy or Eco-team do spot checks each day?
  4. How will you record your findings? 
  5. How will you share with the rest of the school how well you are doing?
  6. How will you reward good performance?
Remember: Getting the temperature right in the classroom is important; too hot and everyone falls asleep and doesn’t learn, too cold and we shiver, and must put extra jumpers on.  
The best temperatures for schools are: 
  • Normal classrooms: 18°C
  • Corridors: 15°C
  • Areas with high levels of activity (e.g. sports halls): 15°C
  • Areas with low levels of activity: 21°C
  • Special needs schools or areas with very young children: 21°C